Homelife and Study

Are you worried your teen’s missed so much time from school they’ll never catch up with their studies? And that when they’re at home they’re not using their time effectively to get work done? There’s plenty you can do to help them achieve their potential – and most of it has nothing to do with studying! Download our free guide to get the answers on how homelife impacts study.

Download our free guide: 

The Parents' Guide to Homelife and Study

Want to help your teen stay focused and on track with their studies? Schools may have re-opened, but that doesn’t mean your teen doesn’t need support at home. Traditionally, this is the time when Year 11 and Year 13 students would be revising hard for their summer examinations. This year it’s different. They’ll be graded by their teachers, based on the work they’ve done over the past two years, including what they’re doing right now. It’s important they continue to do their best throughout the summer term. Years 10 and 12 shouldn’t take it easy either – there’s lots they need to do to get themselves ready for their final course year. We’ve outlined how you can help at home in this guide.

 

The Parents’ Guide to Homelife & Study contains:

 

  • five practical ways to help them stay healthy and boost their immune system;

  • how you can help them study at home by creating the right environment and encouraging healthy study habits;

  • how to protect their mental health, spot the signs of stress and where to go if you’re worried;

  • there’s even a section on looking after yourself!

 

If you know of other parents or carers who would find this guide useful, please share or direct them to this page.

To download this guide, complete the boxes below to obtain your free copy.

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*Wherever we refer to ‘parents’ we mean ‘parents and carers.’ This includes grandparents, older siblings or any other  person with significant caring responsibilities for children.

We have 50 years of research showing that what families do matters. Whether it’s loving school, university access, good attendance, or academic success, family engagement has positive correlations with all sorts of indicators

Dr Mapp - Senior lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education

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94% of parents were confident that their involvement would help their children at school

Review of best practice in parental engagement - Department for Education

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Wherever we refer to ‘parents’ we mean ‘parents and carers.’ This includes grandparents, older siblings or any other  person with significant caring responsibilities for children.